3ds Max & AutoCAD Interoperability - Part 4 - Creating Doors

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Last modification: 26 Feb, 2018
Industry
  • Design Visualization
Subject
  • 2012
  • Media Management
  • Building Levels
  • Environment
  • Workflow
Products
  • 3ds Max
Skill Level
  • Intermediate
Duration
7 min

3ds Max & AutoCAD Interoperability - Part 4 - Creating Doors

In this Part 4 tutorial, you build pivot and sliding doors using 3ds Max's built-in features.

 

 

Notes

  • Recorded in: 3ds Max 2012, AutoCad 2012
  • This tutorial is intended for use with 3ds Max version 2012 or higher.

Transcript

00:00:02 --> 00:00:06
It is now time to fill the wall openings with doors and windows.

00:00:06 --> 00:00:11
Actually, there are no windows in this particular layout, only pivot and sliding doors.

00:00:11 --> 00:00:15
The process of building doors and windows is pretty much the same though.

00:00:16 --> 00:00:21
It is also covered in another tutorial named "Working with AEC Objects".

00:00:21 --> 00:00:24
To create a door, first zoom in on an opening.

00:00:25 --> 00:00:32
Next enable the Snap tool, either on the main toolbar or by pressing the S hotkey.

00:00:33 --> 00:00:38
Right-click the snap tool and make sure it is only set to Endpoint mode.

00:00:39 --> 00:00:43
From the Create panel, choose Geometry > Doors.

00:00:43 --> 00:00:45
Click the Pivot button.

00:00:46 --> 00:00:53
A door (or a window) is created by first defining a width, then a depth, then a height.

00:00:53 --> 00:01:00
The width is defined by using a click and drag and using the snap tool on the walls around the opening.

00:01:01 --> 00:01:06
You can then use the snap tool again to define the depth with a simple click,

00:01:06 --> 00:01:08
and the height with yet another click.

00:01:11 --> 00:01:16
In the Modify panel, you can make the necessary adjustments to the door.

00:01:17 --> 00:01:20
Start by opening it a bit, to see its direction,

00:01:21 --> 00:01:26
then adjust parameters such as Flip Swing or Flip Hinge as you see fit.

00:01:27 --> 00:01:31
For the entrance, you can even opt for a double door.

00:01:34 --> 00:01:38
Right-click the gray area next to the main toolbar and choose Layers.

00:01:38 --> 00:01:44
Notice the Layers list: you have four layers with the 3D prefix incoming from AutoCAD.

00:01:44 --> 00:01:49
You also have Layer 0 which is the default layer and is set current at this time.

00:01:49 --> 00:01:56
Therefore any new objects you create such as the entrance door lies now on Layer 0.

00:01:57 --> 00:02:02
In the spirit of proper layer management, you ought to have a separate layer for doors and windows.

00:02:03 --> 00:02:08
With the door still selected, click the Create New Layer button on the Layers toolbar.

00:02:09 --> 00:02:12
Give the new layer a name, such as 3D-Doors.

00:02:13 --> 00:02:20
Notice the Move Selection to New Layer option. This ensures the current door is moved to the 3D-Doors layer.

00:02:21 --> 00:02:25
Click OK. A new layer is created and the door is now on that layer.

00:02:26 --> 00:02:27
Deselect the door.

00:02:28 --> 00:02:35
Make sure the new 3D-Doors layer is current and take a moment and create other interior doors where you need them.

00:02:35 --> 00:02:38
Adjust them to your liking.

00:03:03 --> 00:03:09
For the closets, use Bifold instead of Pivot doors.

00:03:25 --> 00:03:30
When you're done, take a pause before creating the balcony doors.

00:03:30 --> 00:03:34
Interior doors are usually of a uniform color, or texture.

00:03:35 --> 00:03:40
Most are painted white whereas others are made of maple or oak.

00:03:40 --> 00:03:47
This means you can easily create a simple Standard material based either on a Diffuse color or map,

00:03:50 --> 00:03:55
select all doors using the Select all Objects in Current Layer button,

00:03:56 --> 00:03:59
and apply the newly created material to the selection.

00:03:59 --> 00:04:04
All doors turn white according to the diffuse color chosen in this instance.

00:04:05 --> 00:04:08
The exterior sliding doors are different however.

00:04:08 --> 00:04:16
Their creation process is exactly the same but these patio doors are typically based on a metal structure with glazing.

00:04:20 --> 00:04:26
This means you can't apply a simple Standard material to them; otherwise, they will be totally opaque.

00:04:27 --> 00:04:30
Instead, you use a Multi/Sub-Object material.

00:04:31 --> 00:04:37
All doors and windows have default material IDs. There are five sub-materials in total.

00:04:37 --> 00:04:44
Most importantly, polygons representing glazing are always on Material ID #3.

00:04:44 --> 00:04:54
Other polygons, representing Front, Back, Door Frames and Bevel faces are on IDs #1, 2, 4 and 5 respectively.

00:04:55 --> 00:05:02
Most often with patio doors, the metal part is made of the same material or color, usually painted aluminum.

00:05:03 --> 00:05:08
In that case, IDs #1, 2, 4 & 5 are based on the same material.

00:05:09 --> 00:05:15
To see this better, create a Multi/Sub-Object material based on five sub-materials.

00:05:24 --> 00:05:28
Apply the newly created material to the three patio doors.

00:05:41 --> 00:05:44
Create a semi-transparent Standard material,

00:05:52 --> 00:05:55
and link it to the third channel.

00:05:57 --> 00:06:00
The glazing is now transparent.

00:06:07 --> 00:06:12
Create another Standard material based on a shiny bronze or brown diffuse color,

00:06:19 --> 00:06:22
and instance it to the remaining four channels.

00:06:22 --> 00:06:26
The patio doors now look more convincing.

00:06:30 --> 00:06:33
If some faces still appear dark, you may need a refresh.

00:06:34 --> 00:06:39
Simply select a door and pan the view a bit to let the viewport's "Realistic" mode refresh itself.

00:06:40 --> 00:06:46
In the next and final movie, you'll use Polygon Modeling techniques to build the curtain wall.

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Tags
  • 3ds Max
  • 2012
  • Media Management
  • Building Levels
  • Environment
  • Workflow
1 Comment
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| 2 years ago
thanks you! Im watting continue this topic.